History

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

George Santayana (1905), The Life of Reason
  • Historical Events 1777 – Mjr James Graves Simcoe appointed commandant of Queen's Rangers (Penn) 1928 – German dirigible "Graf Zeppelin" lands in Lakehurst, New Jersey 1959 – KNDO TV channel 23 in Yakima, WA (NBC) begins broadcasting 1968 – American sprinter Wyomia Tyus wins her second consecutive Olympic 100m title with a world record 11.08s; beats teammate Barbara Ferrell by 0.08s for the gold medal at the Mexico City Games 1973 – 7th Country Music Association Award: Roy Clark wins 1992 – Howard Stern radio show begins broadcasting on WLUP-AM, Chicago More Historical Events » Famous Birthdays 1723 – Johann […]
  • On April 14, 1996, third-round leader Greg Norman loses a six-shot lead in the final round of the Masters golf tournament and finishes second—one of the worst collapses in sports history. Nick Faldo wins the green jacket, finishing five strokes ahead of Norman. "I played like a bunch of …
  • On March 29, 1982, 19-year-old North Carolina freshman Michael Jordan makes a 16-foot jump shot with 15 seconds left to give the Tar Heels a 63-62 win over Georgetown for the NCAA Tournament championship. "To tell the truth," Jordan tells reporters in New Orleans afterward, "I didn't see it go in. …
  • On March 16, 1955, NHL president Clarence Campbell suspends Montreal Canadiens star Maurice “Rocket” Richard for the remainder of the regular season and playoffs after he attacks an opponent with his stick and slugs a referee in the head. Riots erupt the following day at the Red Wings-Canadiens …
  • On March 22, 1934, the first Masters golf championships tees off in Augusta, Georgia. The Augusta National Golf Club course presents difficulties for many of the golfers, but Emmet French, Jimmy Hines and Horton Smith finish under par and share the lead after shooting 70, two under par, in the …
  • The Knights of Labor was founded as a secret society of tailors in Philadelphia in 1869. It grew in size and prominence in the early days of the American labor movement from the mid- to late-1800s and played a key role in the Great Railroad Strike of 1877. Uriah Stevens, Knights of Labor …
  • On November 7, 1775, John Murray, fourth Earl of Dunmore and governor of the British colony of Virginia, wrote the document known as Dunmore’s Proclamation. It promised freedom to any indentured servants, enslaved African Americans, or others held in bondage by American revolutionaries, so long as …
  • On March 15, 1869, Cincinnati attorney Aaron Champion hires former cricket player Harry Wright to organize, manage and play for the Cincinnati Red Stockings, who become the first professional baseball team. The organization of the club comes shortly after the National Association of Baseball …
  • On March 9, 1979, the 26 Major League Baseball teams are ordered by MLB commissioner Bowie Kuhn to allow equal access to all reporters, regardless of sex. The commissioner’s order comes after Sports Illustrated reporter Melissa Ludtke’s successful lawsuit against MLB for refusing her …
  • On March 22, 1893, the first women’s college basketball game is played at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. With each made basket counting as one point and the game lasting two 15-minute halves, a sophomore class team prevails over a freshmen team, 5-4. Men are not permitted inside the …
  • On March 5, 1966, Marvin Miller, the 48-year-old assistant to the president of the United Steelworkers of America, is elected the first full-time executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association. Miller, whose role with the United Steelworkers of America included serving as lead …
  • In preparation for an exhibition, all objects undergo a thorough assessment of their condition. Conservators determine whether the objects require stabilization treatment and recommend environmental conditions and mounts so that pieces from our collection can be safely displayed. Conservators play a special role at the Smithsonian, repairing and preserving our national treasures so they can […]
  • Caramelo Deportivo baseball card album after treatment by conservation technician Verónica Mercado Oliveras. The album contains cards of umpires, coaches, and players from Cuba’s four professional teams: Habana, Marianao, Cienfuegos, and Almendares. It also lists past seasons’ champions and records from Major League Baseball. (2016.0369.04)In his book A House of Cards: Baseball Card Collecting and […]
  • It’s late winter of 2006 and an ornate silver speaking trumpet is on offer at a prestigious New York City auction house. The engraved inscription marks it as a gift to the Good Will Engine Company, a volunteer fire company founded in Philadelphia in 1802. The hammer falls on a bid of thousands.It’s springtime of […]
  • In 1967, the magazine Cosmopolitan featured an article about the growing number of job opportunities for women in computer programming. In the article, computing pioneer Dr. Grace Murray Hopper attempted to appeal to the magazine’s readership, commenting on the profession: “It’s just like planning a dinner. . .You have to plan ahead and schedule everything […]
  • The National Museum of American History has over 2 million items in its collections, spanning every topic you could think of. And from wooden crosses to baseball uniforms to costume butterfly wings, our collections show that Latinx people have been an important part of U.S. history since the nation’s beginnings. In celebration of Hispanic Heritage […]
  • During my time at the museum’s object conservation lab, I discovered that a set of painted panels in the museum’s collection had quite a history—most of it hidden from view. The panels are the remaining pieces of a wagon built for a traveling show of Uncle Tom’s Cabin in the early 1900s.In searching to understand […]
  • Custom uniforms display cultural pride and signal Latino presence and excellence in baseball, America’s pastime. The colorful jerseys and unique mascots from Minor League and independent teams from around the country reflect Latinos’ widespread impact on the game.Puerto Rican baseball Roberto Clemente once declared, “When I put on my uniform, I feel I am […]
  • On a Saturday evening in January 1864, abolitionist Anna Dickinson stood inside the Hall of Representatives looking out into the U.S. House’s packed floors and overflowing galleries. Two thousand members of the public, senators, representatives, cabinet members, First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln—and even President Abraham Lincoln himself—were crammed into the hall to witness her speech, […]
  • “The East African Express is Arriving” pen and ink drawing by Clifford Kennedy Berryman, dated August 25, 1909 (GA.12195)This pen and ink drawing showing the Smithsonian Castle building surrounded and overcome with boxes marked “TR,” was prepared by Clifford Kennedy Berryman, the renowned Kentucky-born cartoonist for the newspapers The Washington Post and later, by 1907, […]
  • This glass tube, part of the museum’s collection, once contained a sample of helium. Its paper label reads, “HELIUM / SIR W. RAMSAY, K.C.B., LL.D., F.R.S. / THOMAS TRYER & CO., Ltd. / STRATFORD, LONDON, ENGLAND.” (CH.322963)Helium is the second most abundant element in the universe, but also evanescent and thus hard to hold. It […]
  • We teamed up with the Unknown History podcast on Quick and Dirty Tips to bring you their latest series based on Giles Milton’s Checkmate in Berlin. Read on for more about Episode 2, covering the Soviet occupation of Berlin on … Read the article The post Unknown History: Berlin Turns Red appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Nancy Marie Brown In the following excerpt from The Real Valkyrie, Nancy Marie Brown provides an in-depth look at the Viking economy in Norway’s first true town, a system heavily based on pillaging, enslaving, and trading. The scales… Read the article The post A Viking Economy: Kaupang at Skiringssal appeared first on The History Reader.
  • We teamed up with the Unknown History podcast on Quick and Dirty Tips to bring you their latest series based on Giles Milton’s Checkmate in Berlin. Read on for more about Episode 1, which covers the unlikely bond forged between … Read the article The post Unknown History: The Colonel Who Went to War appeared first on The History Reader.
  • Inspired by a true story, Three Sisters follows the of Livia, Magda, and Cibi as they confront the traumas endured after years of imprisonment in Auschwitz and find true peace in their futures. Read on for a note from … Read the article The post Three Sisters: How One Family Survived Auschwitz appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Rebecca Frankel Rebecca Frankel’s Into the Forest explores a little-known chapter of Holocaust history and one family’s inspiring true story of love, escape, and survival in Bialowieza Forest. Read an excerpt below. In the New York City Clerk’s archive, there are 1,049 … Read the article The post A Great Love Story of a Terrible Time appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Siân Evans Siân Evans, author of Maiden Voyages, shares her great-great uncle’s harrowing adventure of being torpedoed by a German U-boat during WWI. Chief Officer Stephen Gronow On the afternoon of December 19, 1917, south of the Lizard … Read the article The post Chief Officer Stephen Gronow and the Sinking of the Vinovia appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Ellen Feldman It’s a truism that writers are always squirreling away random observations, eavesdropped comments, and stray anecdotes as grist for their literary mills. A novel spanning years and featuring myriad characters can spring from a moment witnessed on … Read the article The post Researching The Living and the Lost appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Nancy Springer In 19th century England, while sons of the well-to-do were sent to boarding school and university, daughters were generally taught at home by governesses. However, most of these governesses were not very well qualified. Being a governess was the … Read the article The post Oh, Those “Girton Girls!” appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Nancy Marie Brown When I began writing The Real Valkyrie, I thought it was going to be a book about bones. It turned out to be a book about bias. Sketch of the archaeological grave found and labeled… Read the article The post Gender Roles Beyond the Grave: Sexing by Metal appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Susan Ronald In the following excerpt from The Ambassador, acclaimed biographer Susan Ronald discusses the early life of Joseph Kennedy, foreshadowing his controversial stint as US Ambassador to Great Britain on the eve of World War II. President Roosevelt… Read the article The post Who was Joe Kennedy? appeared first on The History Reader.
  • The publication of the first issue of a newspaper is a momentous occasion.  After scraping together the funding to purchase equipment, lining up supplies, hiring staff, soliciting subscriptions, selling advertisements, and gathering news to print, the newspaper rolls off the press and is ready to be placed in the hands of the public for them […]
  • Today the American Antiquarian Society releases the new online exhibition Reclaiming Heritage: Digitizing Nipmuc Histories from Colonial Documents. This online resource presents fully-digitized versions of seven pre-1820 Indigenous-language imprints as well as digitized materials from four manuscript collections.  The printed books featured in the exhibition add to an existing archive of early American imprints used […]
  • In a packed box of uncatalogued cabinet photos, in between portraits of the minister Charles Cleveland and the 22nd President, I came across three portraits of a young, dark-haired woman. In each photo, she looked to be about twenty years old — attractive, well-dressed, and entirely unrecognizable to me if it weren’t for the titles […]
  • We are pleased to announce the Fall 2021 schedule for the Virtual Book Talks series. Our lineup includes a variety of topics including astronomy and printing the universe, nineteenth-century printing in Mexico, African American literary practice, and the politics of Native American writing. We ended our summer with Elizabeth Kimball, Assistant Professor of English at […]
  • There are some archival gems you can’t pass up. During my fellowship residency at the American Antiquarian Society in May 2021, AAS staff were helping me comb through the Jacob Porter Papers, when we all noticed it in the catalog record: “An Attempt to Prove the Existence of the Unicorn.”[1] “I want to believe,” someone […]
  • Clark, B. (Benjamin), Sen. The Past, Present and Future in Prose and Poetry. Toronto: Adam, Stevenson, & Co., 1867. BIB #565812 Benjamin Clark was born to emancipated African American parents in Maryland in 1801, and he died in Detroit in 1864. He married, had ten children, and lived with his family in Pennsylvania. He also […]
  • In popular culture within the United States, many have heard of the “snake oil salesman” – a stock character in Western movies depicted as a supposed traveling doctor who peddles “medical” oils, elixirs, tonics, pills, bitters, liniments, tinctures, salts, powders, or syrups to unsuspecting crowds of passers-by. An accomplice in the crowd (a “shill”) attests […]
  • This month, the Program in the History of the Book in American Culture (PHBAC) celebrated its one year anniversary of its Virtual Book Talks series. This new academic program showcases authors of recently published scholarly monographs, digital-equivalents, and creative works broadly related to book history and print culture. Each installment includes a presentation from the […]
  • The lore behind a great story is often as compelling as the story itself. The Female Marine; or the Adventures of Lucy Brewer was originally published by Nathaniel Coverly in 1815 as a series of pamphlets sold across Boston and advertised as the autobiographical account of Lucy Brewer, lauded as the first woman to serve […]
  • Cinderella.  Triumph edition.  Philadelphia: B. Wilmsen, ca. 1880. Bib ID: 604082. The now-obscure Philadelphia publisher B. Wilmsen published this pop-up version of Cinderella enhanced by cut tissue paper as part of his Triumph edition series, which featured fairy tales including Red Riding Hood and Hansel and Gretel. Although Wilmsen held the American copyright, the book […]
Influenza victims crowd into an emergency hospital near Fort Riley, Kansas in this 1918 file photo. The 1918 pandemic killed at least 20 million people worldwide and officials say that if the next pandemic resemblers the birdlike 1918 Spanish flu, to 1.9 million Americans could die. (AP Photo/National Museum of Health)
  • We teamed up with the Unknown History podcast on Quick and Dirty Tips to bring you their latest series based on Giles Milton’s Checkmate in Berlin. Read on for more about Episode 2, covering the Soviet occupation of Berlin on … Read the article The post Unknown History: Berlin Turns Red appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Nancy Marie Brown In the following excerpt from The Real Valkyrie, Nancy Marie Brown provides an in-depth look at the Viking economy in Norway’s first true town, a system heavily based on pillaging, enslaving, and trading. The scales… Read the article The post A Viking Economy: Kaupang at Skiringssal appeared first on The History […]
  • We teamed up with the Unknown History podcast on Quick and Dirty Tips to bring you their latest series based on Giles Milton’s Checkmate in Berlin. Read on for more about Episode 1, which covers the unlikely bond forged between … Read the article The post Unknown History: The Colonel Who Went to War appeared […]
  • Inspired by a true story, Three Sisters follows the of Livia, Magda, and Cibi as they confront the traumas endured after years of imprisonment in Auschwitz and find true peace in their futures. Read on for a note from … Read the article The post Three Sisters: How One Family Survived Auschwitz appeared first […]
  • by Rebecca Frankel Rebecca Frankel’s Into the Forest explores a little-known chapter of Holocaust history and one family’s inspiring true story of love, escape, and survival in Bialowieza Forest. Read an excerpt below. In the New York City Clerk’s archive, there are 1,049 … Read the article The post A Great Love Story of a Terrible Time appeared […]
  • by Siân Evans Siân Evans, author of Maiden Voyages, shares her great-great uncle’s harrowing adventure of being torpedoed by a German U-boat during WWI. Chief Officer Stephen Gronow On the afternoon of December 19, 1917, south of the Lizard … Read the article The post Chief Officer Stephen Gronow and the Sinking of the Vinovia […]
  • by Ellen Feldman It’s a truism that writers are always squirreling away random observations, eavesdropped comments, and stray anecdotes as grist for their literary mills. A novel spanning years and featuring myriad characters can spring from a moment witnessed on … Read the article The post Researching The Living and the Lost appeared first on The […]
  • by Nancy Springer In 19th century England, while sons of the well-to-do were sent to boarding school and university, daughters were generally taught at home by governesses. However, most of these governesses were not very well qualified. Being a governess was the … Read the article The post Oh, Those “Girton Girls!” appeared first on The History […]
  • by Nancy Marie Brown When I began writing The Real Valkyrie, I thought it was going to be a book about bones. It turned out to be a book about bias. Sketch of the archaeological grave found and labeled… Read the article The post Gender Roles Beyond the Grave: Sexing by Metal appeared first on […]
  • by Susan Ronald In the following excerpt from The Ambassador, acclaimed biographer Susan Ronald discusses the early life of Joseph Kennedy, foreshadowing his controversial stint as US Ambassador to Great Britain on the eve of World War II. President Roosevelt… Read the article The post Who was Joe Kennedy? appeared first on The History Reader.
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Reliving History Magazine: Summer 2018 Issue

Reliving History Magazine

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