History

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

George Santayana (1905), The Life of Reason
  • Historical Events 1874 – Barracks on Alcatraz Island destroyed in fire 1916 – Italians troops conquer Col di Lana at Merano 1928 – Japanese troops occupies Sjantung-schiereiland 1992 – "4 Baboons Adoring the Sun" closes at Beaumont NYC after 38 performances 1994 – "Illmatic" debut studio album by US rapper Nas is released 2021 – New Zealand and Australia open a travel bubble between the two countries after more than a year of border closures More Historical Events » Famous Birthdays 1874 – Ernst Rüdin, Swiss-German psychiatrist, geneticist, and eugenicist, born in St. Gallen, Switzerland (d. 1952) 1883 – Richard […]
  • On April 20, 1971, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously declares busing for the purposes of desegregation to be constitutional. The decision in Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education settled the constitutional question and allowed the widespread implementation of busing, which …
  • Founding Father Samuel Adams was a thorn in the side of the British in the years before the American Revolution. As a political activist and state legislator, he spoke out against British efforts to tax the colonists, and pressured merchants to boycott British products. He also was an …
  • What began as a labor dispute between white and Chinese coal miners on September 2, 1885 turned into a bloodbath known as the Rock Springs Massacre that left 28 Chinese miners dead and 15 others wounded. Following the violence, white miners set 79 homes ablaze, effectively wiping out the Chinatown …
  • For four years, from 1914 to 1918, World War raged across Europe's western and eastern fronts, after growing tensions and then the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria ignited the war. Trench warfare and the early use of tanks, submarines and airplanes meant the war’s battles were …
  • All roads lead to Rome – and so do these tech trees! From the newspaper to the vending machine, these are 8 amazing Roman technological innovations, in this episode of History Countdown.
  • Bleeding Kansas describes the period of repeated outbreaks of violent guerrilla warfare between pro-slavery and anti-slavery forces following the creation of the new territory of Kansas in 1854. In all, some 55 people were killed between 1855 and 1859. The struggle intensified the ongoing …
  • In 1854, Senator Stephen Douglas of Illinois proposed a bill to organize the Territory of Nebraska, a vast area of land that become Kansas, Nebraska, Montana and the Dakotas. Known as the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the controversial bill raised the possibility that slavery could be extended into …
  • Mochi has been a staple Japanese food for thousands of years – and was once the superfood of the samurai! In this episode, Sohla El-Waylly makes mochi how the samurai of feudal would have eaten it, along with a daifuku version from the 1700s.
  • Pizza has been around for so long it’s impossible to pinpoint the exact origins. In this episode of Ancient Recipes, Sohla recreates one of the coolest ancient versions of pizza how 6th century BCE Persian soldiers would have made it: on their shields!
  • These 6 women were true triple threats: performers, celebrities – and spies! From Julia Child to Audrey Hepburn, these are 6 famous women who were secretly spies, in this episode of History Countdown.
  • "Girlhood (It’s complicated)" opened to the public on October 9, 2020.Three years ago our museum convened a diverse group of scholars and educators to help a team brainstorm a new exhibition about women's history to mark the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment. The team had already asked our visitors to help us identify what […]
  • A sudden tragedy thrust Rebecca Lukens into the family business and into history, making her the nation’s first industrialist and the only woman to run and eventually own an iron mill in the United States during the 1800s.Rebecca Lukens, from the collections of the National Iron and Steel Heritage Museum, Coatesville, PennsylvaniaIn 1825, at […]
  • On January 6, my wife and I watched the live news broadcasts in disbelief at the scenes unfolding on television, as a violent mob stormed the U.S. Capitol and interrupted the constitutionally mandated joint session of Congress presided over by the vice president to ratify the 2020 election results. Often curators like to hold off […]
  • As a little girl, Jessica Govea had become accustomed to rising early and making her way to the fields with her family. During the cotton season, you could find her family dragging sacks of cotton along the long rows of fields in Kern County, California. Her father had travelled a long way from Mexico. He […]
  • For many high school students in the United States, prom is considered one of the most highly anticipated events of the school year. Teenagers plan months in advance on what to wear to the event, and magazines have devoted entire issues to prom fashion. Typically held in the spring, the annual dance serves as an […]
  • While the iconic egg-shaped Beautyblender sponge is wildly popular and used by makeup professionals and everyday people from all backgrounds all over the world, few people know the story behind the company and how it got its start. The history and development of Beautyblender, as well as the life story of its founder, Rea Ann […]
  • When he reflected later in life on why, as a young , he chose to enlist during wartime, Carlos Martinez said that avoiding service was never an option, not for his community and not for himself. In the mid-1960s, the United States had begun fighting the Soviet-supported North Vietnamese as part of its Cold War […]
  • Within a gallery stands a rifle once presented to Theodore Roosevelt. It is perhaps an odd gift, considering that it was given to him with a note remarking on “his services on behalf of the preservation of species.” How do you preserve a species, and what does a gun have to do with it?Elephants and […]
  • After the end of World War I, Germany was in economic crisis and was unable to provide enough currency for its citizens. In response, cities and towns under German control created their own form of emergency currency, called notgeld, to supplement the limited national currency in circulation. The locally-issued notgeld were highly illustrated, colorful, and […]
  • Until the successes of the United Farm Workers (UFW) in the 1960s, agriculture was one of the last industries to hold out on unionization due to social and legal obstacles. Workers and organizers faced uneven legal protection; isolation; prejudice; reliance on imported, exploitable workers; and opposition from state and federal officials who either represented agribusiness […]
  • Today is the anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's death. Instead of a story about Lincoln, we're posting a story about a teacher who, each year in history class, tears the great president down to human size—so as to help students grasp his greatness. Royce Aldridge admits to a “hero-worship” of Lincoln. As a teacher at Yerington […]
  • High above the football stadium at Clemson University sits Fort Hill, the stately antebellum home of John C. Calhoun. On game days at Clemson, the marching band parades down the hill in front of Calhoun's house on its way to Memorial Stadium, nicknamed “Death Valley” by the Clemson faithful. Countless fans follow the band to […]
  • Join us for our April episode of Documents in Detail, focusing on Abraham Lincoln's Resolution Submitting the 13th Amendment to the States. Panelists: Dr. John Moser, Ashland University Dr. Elizabeth Amato, Gardner-Webb University Dr. Andrew Lang, Mississippi State University Register Here The post Documents in Detail: Lincoln’s Resolution Submitting the 13th Amendment to the States […]
  • Our final Documents in Detail webinar for the 2020-21 school year, and the last in our years-long series "Selections from the 50 Core Documents," this program will focus on Douglass' words and thoughts on Lincoln, as well as his message for future generations about his times. The live program will take place on 12 May […]
  • Today we are pleased to feature a post by Stacy Moses, a teacher at Sandia Preparatory School in Albuquerque, NM. Moses completed her Master of Arts in American History and Government degree in 2017, submitting the thesis, "Not Even Grant Could Save the Country: Reconstruction, the Resistance of the South, and the Expansion of Federal […]
  • Slavery and its Consequences was recently released in Teaching American History’s Core Document Collection. We talked with the volume’s  editor, David Tucker, to learn what he hopes the collection contributes to the CDC series and to our understanding of the contested history of racial justice in America. Now a Senior Fellow at Ashbrook and General […]
  • Beginning on April 12th, 1861, Confederate guns around Charleston Harbor opened fire on Ft. Sumter, a small Union fort on an island in the harbor. Some 34 hours later, Union forces surrendered, and the evacuation of the fort began on April 14th. Although small skirmishes had already taken place elsewhere between Union and secessionist forces, […]
  • Our final 'Remember the Ladies' webinar for Spring 2021, focusing on the first female United States Supreme Court Justice, Sandra Day O'Connor. Appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1981, she served until 2006, authoring numerous important opinions and leaving an important judicial legacy. This episode airs live on Saturday, 1 May 2021 at 11am Eastern […]
  • President Woodrow Wilson, on April 2nd, 1917, spoke before a special joint session of Congress, and presented his argument for why the United States should abandon neutrality and opt for war with Germany and its allies. After war broke out in Europe in August, 1914, the United States government, with Wilson in the White House, […]
  • Teachers attending Teaching American History programs find new colleagues—educators who may live far away, yet care just as deeply about educating young citizens. Such colleagues are huge assets for working teachers. They point out new resources, share teaching strategies, and deepen each other’s thinking about history and government. Many teachers go out of their way […]
  • by Mariah Fredericks It’s always wonderful when a novel becomes a cheap excuse to do a deep dive into a subject near and dear to your heart. When researching Death of a Showman, the fourth Jane Prescott mystery, I was … Read the article The post A Tour of the Belasco Theatre appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Gwen Strauss The Nine follows the true story of author Gwen Strauss’s great aunt Hélène Podliasky, who led a band of nine female resistance fighters as they escaped a German forced labor camp and made a ten-day journey across the … Read the article The post The Escape of the Nine appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Jack Kelly I have traveled to Revolutionary-era battlefields and forts. I’ve examined countless eighteenth-century muskets, uniforms, swords, and shoe buckles. I’ve looked at the original Declaration of Independence in the National Archives. Yet a single artifact has always stood … Read the article The post The Philadelphia: Our Most Evocative National Relic appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Tom Beaujour and Richard Bienstock Hard rock in the 1980s was a hedonistic and often intensely creative wellspring of escapism that perfectly encapsulated—and maybe even helped to define—a spectacularly over-the-top decade. The following photos reflect some of the most … Read the article The post An Uncensored History of the ’80s Hard Rock Explosion appeared first on The History Reader.
  • By The History Reader Major League Baseball’s Opening Day has long been a symbol of rebirth for baseball fans, a day where the previous season’s slate is wiped clean as records reset to 0-0. From the first Opening Day on … Read the article The post Calling All Baseball Fans: Books to Read for Opening Day appeared first on The History Reader.
  • By Ron Swoboda In Here’s the Catch, right fielder Ron Swoboda tells the story of the Mets’ miraculous 1969 World Series win, the incredible season leading up to that moment, the people he played with and against (sometimes at the … Read the article The post Here’s the Catch: Pathway to the Majors appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Peter Ackroyd In the following excerpt from Revolution, Peter Ackroyd transports readers to England in 1714, where Prince George of Germany is about to be crowned King George I of Great Britain. George I of Great Britain as painted… Read the article The post The New King: George I of Great Britain appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Jill Wine-Banks Obstruction of justice, the specter of impeachment, sexism at work, shocking revelations: Jill Wine-Banks takes us inside her trial by fire in The Watergate Girl as a Watergate prosecutor. Read an excerpt below. Watergate Prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks… Read the article The post The Watergate Girl: Joining the Team appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Jess Montgomery The first images that usually pop to mind with the word “Prohibition” are of dapper men and women in speakeasies enjoying illicit libations… until police officers brandishing guns and batons rush in to raid the joint and … Read the article The post Did the Government Purposefully Poison Drinkers During Prohibition? appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by The History Reader In 1981, Congress declared the week of March 7th as “Women’s History Week.” This was between second and third-wave feminism, so people did not think one week was enough. After many petitions, Congress officially dedicated the … Read the article The post Celebrating Women’s History Month in 2021 appeared first on The History Reader.
  • A Fellow’s Experience: Kirsten Fischer We asked Kirsten Fischer, associate professor of history at the University of Minnesota and a former AAS Peterson Fellow (2016 –17), to discuss how her research at the Society helped shape her recently published book, American Freethinker: Elihu Palmer and the Struggle for Religious in the New Nation (2020). […]
  • Last September, Jessica Pressman, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at San Diego State University, was a featured guest at the Virtual Book Talk series sponsored by the Program in the History of the Book in American Culture (PHBAC).  Jessica spoke about her recent publication, Bookishness: Loving Books in a Digital Age, published in […]
  • In a letter dated July 11, 1889, Frederick Douglass laments the death of a friend. Composed on an early typewriter, the letter is addressed to William Brown, one of Worcester’s wealthiest Black residents and owner of an upholstery business in the city. Douglass writes, “I had few friends of the early times whom I remember […]
  • Here at AAS, we’ve always enjoyed Valentine’s Day. From various blog posts to our online exhibit on Victorian Valentines, we have fun promoting the holiday. This year, we thought we’d go in a different direction and look at what could happen when love doesn’t go as planned. Breach of promise lawsuits occurred when a person, […]
  • For Black History Month, the American Antiquarian Society is featuring historic objects from the collection that are associated with or depict Black Worcester residents. The Society’s portrait of John Moore Jr. was painted in Boston in 1826 when the sitter was in his twenties. He was the only son of John Moore Sr. (1751-1836), a […]
  • Most members of the American Antiquarian Society are aware of the enormous contributions made by the Salisbury family of Worcester County, Massachusetts. Stephen Salisbury II served as president of the Society from 1854 until his death in 1884, and his son, Stephen Salisbury III, served as president from 1887 until his death in 1905. (A […]
  • Birthday and Autograph Album. Bethlehem [Pa.]: Henry T. Clauder, 1874. Partially printed books that were meant to be filled in by their owners have been of particular interest to AAS’s curators over many years. AAS’s online catalog already has more than 200 records with the genre term: Partly printed, partly blank books. One example is […]
  • The gallery doors that opened, closed, and then reopened on the 2019-2020 traveling exhibition Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere have now closed for the final time. In recent weeks, the exhibition’s many rare prints, paintings, and decorative arts objects were condition checked, packed, and shipped via art handlers safely back to their respective homes. Split between […]
  • Cuffe Lawton (b. 1789) was a free black man who was born in Newport, Rhode Island, and lived in New Bedford, Massachusetts. His son, Francis Lawton (1822-1885) was born in New Bedford  and became a whale man, who eventually rose to the rank of mate and traveled to Hawaii. By the 1850s Francis was married […]
  • This month AAS produced four short videos introducing collections related to gravestones and cemeteries in the United States. Old burial grounds are treasure houses of American sculpture and of historical and genealogical information. Documenting gravestones through rubbings and photographs became popular at the end of the nineteenth century, and the Society preserves several collections of […]
Influenza victims crowd into an emergency hospital near Fort Riley, Kansas in this 1918 file photo. The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic killed at least 20 million people worldwide and officials say that if the next pandemic resemblers the birdlike 1918 Spanish flu, to 1.9 million Americans could die. (AP Photo/National Museum of Health)
  • by Mariah Fredericks It’s always wonderful when a novel becomes a cheap excuse to do a deep dive into a subject near and dear to your heart. When researching Death of a Showman, the fourth Jane Prescott mystery, I was … Read the article The post A Tour of the Belasco Theatre appeared first on […]
  • by Gwen Strauss The Nine follows the true story of author Gwen Strauss’s great aunt Hélène Podliasky, who led a band of nine female resistance fighters as they escaped a German forced labor camp and made a ten-day journey across the … Read the article The post The Escape of the Nine appeared first on The […]
  • by Jack Kelly I have traveled to Revolutionary-era battlefields and forts. I’ve examined countless eighteenth-century muskets, uniforms, swords, and shoe buckles. I’ve looked at the original Declaration of Independence in the National Archives. Yet a single artifact has always stood … Read the article The post The Philadelphia: Our Most Evocative National Relic appeared first […]
  • by Tom Beaujour and Richard Bienstock Hard rock in the 1980s was a hedonistic and often intensely creative wellspring of escapism that perfectly encapsulated—and maybe even helped to define—a spectacularly over-the-top decade. The following photos reflect some of the most … Read the article The post An Uncensored History of the ’80s Hard Rock Explosion […]
  • By The History Reader Major League Baseball’s Opening Day has long been a symbol of rebirth for baseball fans, a day where the previous season’s slate is wiped clean as records reset to 0-0. From the first Opening Day on … Read the article The post Calling All Baseball Fans: Books to Read for Opening […]
  • By Ron Swoboda In Here’s the Catch, right fielder Ron Swoboda tells the story of the Mets’ miraculous 1969 World Series win, the incredible season leading up to that moment, the people he played with and against (sometimes at the … Read the article The post Here’s the Catch: Pathway to the Majors appeared first […]
  • by Peter Ackroyd In the following excerpt from Revolution, Peter Ackroyd transports readers to England in 1714, where Prince George of Germany is about to be crowned King George I of Great Britain. George I of Great Britain as painted… Read the article The post The New King: George I of Great Britain appeared first […]
  • by Jill Wine-Banks Obstruction of justice, the specter of impeachment, sexism at work, shocking revelations: Jill Wine-Banks takes us inside her trial by fire in The Watergate Girl as a Watergate prosecutor. Read an excerpt below. Watergate Prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks… Read the article The post The Watergate Girl: Joining the Team appeared first on The […]
  • by Jess Montgomery The first images that usually pop to mind with the word “Prohibition” are of dapper men and women in speakeasies enjoying illicit libations… until police officers brandishing guns and batons rush in to raid the joint and … Read the article The post Did the Government Purposefully Poison Drinkers During Prohibition? appeared […]
  • by The History Reader In 1981, Congress declared the week of March 7th as “Women’s History Week.” This was between second and third-wave feminism, so people did not think one week was enough. After many petitions, Congress officially dedicated the … Read the article The post Celebrating Women’s History Month in 2021 appeared first on […]
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Reliving History Magazine: Summer 2018 Issue

Reliving History Magazine

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