History

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

George Santayana (1905), The Life of Reason
  • Historical Events 1868 – Grito de Lares proclaims Puerto Rico’s independence (crushed by Spain) 1913 – Women protests take place in the Free State, South Africa, led by Charlotte Maxeke, resisting government attempts to impose passes on women; passes are burnt in front of the municipal offices 1922 – Berthold Brecht’s “Drum in the Night” premieres in Germany 1963 – Georgette Ciselet is 1st woman on Belgian Council of State 1983 – Argentine military regime gives amnesty to military and political assassins 2012 – Scientists discover four genetically distinct types of breast cancer More Historical Events » Famous Birthdays 1887 […]
  • On November 8, 1994, 59 percent of California voters approve Proposition 187, banning undocumented immigrants from using the state’s major public services. Despite its wide margin of victory, the ballot measure never takes effect. In 1994, California, the home of Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald …
  • The American Hispanic/Latinx history is a rich, diverse and long one, with immigrants, refugees and Spanish-speaking or indigenous people living in the United States since long before the nation was established. And, bringing with them traditions and culture from Mexico, Spain, Cuba, Puerto Rico, …
  • Hispanic Heritage Month is an annual celebration of the history and culture of the U.S. Latinx and Hispanic communities. The event, which spans from September 15 to October 15, commemorates how those communities have influenced and contributed to American society at large. The term Hispanic or …
  • On September 6, 2018 an off-duty Dallas police officer fatally shoots an unarmed Black man in the victim’s own apartment.  Returning to her apartment complex in Dallas, Texas, police officer Amber Guyger entered the apartment of Botham Jean, believing it to be her own. The apartment door …
  • On August 29, 1970, more than 20,000 Mexican-Americans march through East Los Angeles to protest the Vietnam War. The Chicano Moratorium, as this massive protest was known, was peaceful until the Los Angeles Police entered Laguna Park, sparking violence and rioting that led to three deaths. …
  • On August 21, 1980, animal rights advocates Ingrid Newkirk and Alex Pacheco found People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Rising from humble beginnings, PETA will soon become the world’s foremost and most controversial animal rights organization. Newkirk’s interest in protecting animals began …
  • On August 9, 2014, police officer Darren Wilson shoots and kills Michael Brown, an unarmed Black teenager, in the street of Ferguson, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis. Protests and riots ensue in Ferguson and soon spread across the country. There are many different accounts of the incident, …
  • On August 8, 2008, a long-simmering conflict between Russia and Georgia boiled over into a shooting war between the small Caucasian nation and the superpower of which it was once a part. The brief Russo-Georgian War was the most violent episode in a conflict that began more than a decade before. …
  • A mass shooting takes place early in the morning in Dayton, Ohio on August 4, 2019. The killing of nine people and the injuries of 27 was significant in its own right, but this mass shooting was particularly notable for being America’s second in less than 24 hours. Just one day before, a shooter …
  • On August 1, 1943, 177 B-24 bombers take off from an Allied base in Libya, bound for the oil-producing city Ploiești, Romania, nicknamed “Hitler’s gas station.” The daring raid, known as Operation Tidal Wave, resulted in five men being awarded the Medal of Honor—three of them posthumously—but …
  • Last year I began working as a stage manager for Join the Student Sit-Ins, an interactive theater program at the museum set in 1960. The program simulates the training sessions students at HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities) like North Carolina A&T and Bennett carried out in the weeks following the Greensboro lunch counter sit-ins. […]
  • A mere 75 years ago aboard the battleship Missouri, representatives of the Japanese Emperor, his government, and the Imperial General Headquarters signed the Instrument of Surrender in a ceremonial end to the 20th century’s greatest conflict. That same day, three future curators and the inaugural director of the National Museum of American History were serving […]
  • The writers of the Black Life in Two Pandemics series have examined the deep roots of racial violence in the Midwest and the connections between that history and the COVID-19 pandemic.The series was inspired, in part, by commentators who were shocked and bewildered by the virulence of anti-Black violence in the Midwest. This surprise indicates […]
  • IntroductionOur political and legal systems are inextricably intertwined with and fueled by structural racism. This legacy predates the country’s founding, through the genocide of Indigenous populations and the kidnapping and selling of millions of Africans into slavery. Preeminent public health scholar and former president of the American Public Health Association Dr. Camara Jones defines structural […]
  • In March 2020, the Urban Art Mapping research team, a small group of faculty and students from the University of St. Thomas in Saint Paul, Minnesota, was busy conducting interviews with community members of Midway, a bustling, diverse neighborhood. Located in the middle of a six-mile stretch between downtown Saint Paul and downtown Minneapolis along […]
  • Minnesota doesn’t typically come to mind when you think about slavery and the Civil War. It’s also not a place that’s figured into the national imagination when it comes to Black activism, either—at least, not until recently. However, as part of the series on “Black Life in Two Pandemics,” this post draws on several events […]
  • With the murder of George Floyd and the ensuing civil unrest, historians, educators, and the general public once again fixated on the “long hot summers” of the 1960s. Where every year, for the latter half of the decade, America was embroiled in widespread violent protest. While this keystone era certainly provides some background for the […]
  • George Floyd’s Memorial Day 2020 killing by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin shook the nation. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the viral video documenting him being choked for 8 minutes and 46 seconds while in police custody laid bare the reality of Black life amid a global health crisis. In the wake of Floyd’s death, thousands […]
  • “Destruction by fire of Pennsylvania Hall, the new building of the Abolition Society, on the night of the 17th May,” courtesy of Library of CongressJohn Langston was running through a neighborhood in ruins. Burned homes and businesses were still smoking, their windows shattered. Langston was only 12 years old, but he was determined to save […]
  • Racism has been a public health emergency in America for over 400 years. We can call it a crisis or disaster or something else entirely. What we have named it has made little difference in the social forces that sustain hierarchies of advantage, the biases that make people targets, or the rage that propels people […]
  • Today we continue our exploration of Teaching American History’s two-volume document collection, Documents and Debates in American History and Government. In 1994, CBS broadcast the film Against Her Will, the story of Carrie Buck, a young Virginia mother forced to undergo involuntary sterilization in 1927. In the opening scene, Virginia Governor Elbert Lee Trinkle makes […]
  • September 17—Constitution Day—commemorates the final day of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, when the delegates signed the document they had crafted during 88 days of intense discussions, beginning in the preceding May. Those deliberations had been conducted in strict secrecy, to allow delegates to consider a range of options, without being derailed by criticism from […]
  • On 27 January 1838, notable local lawyer Abraham Lincoln addressed the Young Men’s Lyceum in Springfield, Illinois. This social and civic organization was made up of prominent and would-be prominent young men of the town and surrounding area and served as a place where its members could listen to interesting and useful speeches and, it […]
  • From September 11 – 28, 1893, the city of Chicago hosted what is now recognized as the first formal interfaith gathering in America. Known as the Parliament of the World’s Religions, the idea for the gathering grew out concerns that the planned World’s Columbian Exposition was excessively materialistic in its focus. As the Exposition planners arranged demonstrations […]
  • Today we continue our exploration of Teaching American History’s two-volume document collection, Documents and Debates in American History and Government Almost exactly 230 years ago—on August 17, 1790—President George Washington arrived in Newport, Rhode Island. He was there to welcome the state, which had recently ratified the Constitution, into the Union. But his visit also […]
  • This weekend, Americans will enjoy an extra day off as the nation observes Labor Day. Now a national holiday, the observance of a day in honor of the contributions of American workers began at the local level in the late nineteenth century. Yet discussions of the importance of hard work and the value of working […]
  • On 23 SEP 20 we will look at James Madison’s Speech on the Amendments to the Constitution, from 8 June 1789, wherein the “Father of the Constitution” adds, some scholars would argue. “Father of the Bill of Rights” to his titles. This free 60-minute webinar will take place at 7pm ET on 23 SEP 20, […]
  • As the 2020 school year begins in Florida, a months-long pandemic continues, putting new demands on teachers. Jennifer Jolley has spent the summer rethinking her lesson plans so as to meet the challenge. Yet she admits to feeling like a first-timer. She has dedicated 27 years to her profession, and was just named 2020 Florida Social […]
  • Join teachers from across the country on Saturday, 3 October 2020 for our discussion of the true causes of the Civil War – was it really all about slavery, or something else? Our scholars will discuss this issue based in part on a selection of original sources. All participants will be provided with a printable […]
  • At TAH, we know plans for the return to school this fall remain in flux in many districts—and that even though in many cases classroom instruction won’t look ‘like normal,’ you and your colleagues will be asked to teach much of the same curriculum you always teach. If ways to incorporate distanced learning forms any […]
  • by Eric A. Posner Huey Long: United States Governor, Senator, and perhaps one of its greatest demagogues. In the following excerpt from The Demagogue’s Playbook, Eric A. Posner examines how Long highlighted American democracy’s susceptibility to the demagogue in the … Read the article The post The Art of the Demagogue appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Lieberman In the following excerpt from their book Four Threats, Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Lieberman discuss the violent rise of Southern Democrats in post-Civil War Wilmington, North Carolina that turned back decades of … Read the article The post A Coup D’état, American Style appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Ian Olasov There are at least three reasons to read philosophers from other times and places. The first is that they are sometimes right (and sometimes in surprising ways), and we can learn from them when they are. The … Read the article The post Philosophers Throughout History You’ve Probably Never Heard Of: Part I appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Thomas A. Schwartz Over the past six decades, Henry Kissinger has been America’s most consistently praised—and reviled—public figure. He was hailed as a “miracle worker” for his peacemaking in the Middle East, pursuit of détente with the Soviet Union, … Read the article The post The Making of Henry Kissinger appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Kerri Arsenault Kerri Arsenault grew up in the rural working class town of Mexico, Maine. For over 100 years the community orbited around a paper mill that employed three generations of Arsenault’s family. The mill, while providing livelihoods for … Read the article The post Cancer Valley appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Hannah Dennison It’s a well-known fact that cats and writers share a special bond.  As the American author, Andre Norton (1912-2005) said, “Perhaps it is because cats do not live by human patterns, do not fit themselves into prescribed … Read the article The post Ostreophile, Traveling Companion, Whiskey Lover, Con-Artist and…Mews? appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Ken McNab When the swirling crosscurrents of music and politics collide, a powerful social maelstrom is often left in its wake. In 1969, American rock ‘n’ roll staggered towards the end of an era which the literary critic … Read the article The post John Lennon: Historic Man of the People and the Pied Piper of the Sixties Peace Movement appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Lieberman As the 1800 presidential election neared, Americans braced themselves. The Federalists, who dominated the presidency and both chambers of Congress, had become convinced that the Republicans, who functioned as the emerging opposition party, … Read the article The post The Soil Will Be Soaked with Blood appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Susan Eisenhower Few people have made decisions as momentous as Eisenhower, nor has one person had to make such a varied range of them. From D-Day to the Red Scare to the Missile Gap controversies, Ike was able to … Read the article The post How Ike Led: Accountability Without Caveats appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Elsa Hart In 1714, the gardener and caretaker Edmund Howard supervised his employer’s move to a new home. It was an exhausting endeavor, and anyone who has stared into an overfull cardboard box at four in the morning on … Read the article The post Collecting the Treasures of the World appeared first on The History Reader.
  • In advance of my summer work placement at the American Antiquarian Society, I discussed a slate of proposed activities with Chief Conservator Babette Gehnrich while in New York City. On their list was a housing project for manuscripts, standardized treatments of broadsides, and an introduction to digitization workflows for the Society’s collections. “Also,” she mentioned […]
  • Since the late 1960s, the American Antiquarian Society has been a sponsor of the Cooper Edition, a scholarly edition of Cooper’s works that conforms to the editorial principles approved by the Committee on Scholarly Editions (CSE) (formerly the Center for Editions of American Authors) of the Modern Language Association.  To facilitate the production of the […]
  • This summer, even amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, I was given the immense privilege to be the first Seiler Curatorial Intern at the American Antiquarian Society. Even through uncertain times, the Society and my supervisor Ashley Cataldo, Curator of Manuscripts, advocated for my internship and was able to offer me a blended virtual and in-person experience. […]
  • This week we continue our Artists in the AAS Archive series.  This installment offers a spotlight on four more past fellows: book artist Maureen Cummins; performer-scholar Anne Harley; playwright and screenwriter Jeffrey Hatcher; and playwright and performer Laurie McCants. This series celebrates the 25th anniversary of Artist fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society.  More information […]
  • It should come as no surprise that the staff here at the American Antiquarian Society is passionate about books and prints related to American history.  But we’re also deeply committed to our pets. From time to time, we’ll even share photos of our favorite furry or feathered friends on the AAS Instagram page. Today is […]
  • In May 2020, the Program in the History of the Book in American Culture (PHBAC) launched its Virtual Book Talks series. This new academic program showcases authors of recently published scholarly monographs, digital-equivalents, and creative works broadly related to book history and print culture. Each installment includes a presentation from the author and a Q&A […]
  • As we wind down a summer with limited travel and with conferences postponed or transitioned online, I can’t help but reminisce about a summer in the far distant past (last year) when two bright young AAS staff members, who really enjoy food (and sweet treats), descended upon the city of Baltimore in search of local […]
  • This week we continue our Artists in the AAS Archive series.  This installment offers a spotlight on four past fellows: poet James Arthur; poet and nonfiction author Christopher Cokinos; Cartoonist R. Sikoryak; and artist Stephanie Wolff. This series is part of our celebration of the 25th anniversary of Artist fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society.  […]
  • The Colored Conventions was a series of national, regional, and state meetings held irregularly during the decades preceding and following the American Civil War.  At the 1853 convention held in Rochester, New York, delegates insisted citizenship was their birthright: “By birth, we are American citizens; by the meaning of the United States Constitution, we are […]
  • The curators at AAS connect audiences with objects, such as the manuscript poems of Phillis Wheatley. As some visitors to AAS know, the Society holds two original manuscript poems of Wheatley’s, “To the University of Cambridge” and “On the Death of the Revd. Dr. Sewall.” These items may be found in the AAS catalog here. […]
Influenza victims crowd into an emergency hospital near Fort Riley, Kansas in this 1918 file photo. The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic killed at least 20 million people worldwide and officials say that if the next pandemic resemblers the birdlike 1918 Spanish flu, to 1.9 million Americans could die. (AP Photo/National Museum of Health)
  • by Eric A. Posner Huey Long: United States Governor, Senator, and perhaps one of its greatest demagogues. In the following excerpt from The Demagogue’s Playbook, Eric A. Posner examines how Long highlighted American democracy’s susceptibility to the demagogue in the … Read the article The post The Art of the Demagogue appeared first on The […]
  • by Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Lieberman In the following excerpt from their book Four Threats, Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Lieberman discuss the violent rise of Southern Democrats in post-Civil War Wilmington, North Carolina that turned back decades of … Read the article The post A Coup D’état, American Style appeared first on The […]
  • by Ian Olasov There are at least three reasons to read philosophers from other times and places. The first is that they are sometimes right (and sometimes in surprising ways), and we can learn from them when they are. The … Read the article The post Philosophers Throughout History You’ve Probably Never Heard Of: Part […]
  • by Thomas A. Schwartz Over the past six decades, Henry Kissinger has been America’s most consistently praised—and reviled—public figure. He was hailed as a “miracle worker” for his peacemaking in the Middle East, pursuit of détente with the Soviet Union, … Read the article The post The Making of Henry Kissinger appeared first on The […]
  • by Kerri Arsenault Kerri Arsenault grew up in the rural working class town of Mexico, Maine. For over 100 years the community orbited around a paper mill that employed three generations of Arsenault’s family. The mill, while providing livelihoods for … Read the article The post Cancer Valley appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Hannah Dennison It’s a well-known fact that cats and writers share a special bond.  As the American author, Andre Norton (1912-2005) said, “Perhaps it is because cats do not live by human patterns, do not fit themselves into prescribed … Read the article The post Ostreophile, Traveling Companion, Whiskey Lover, Con-Artist and…Mews? appeared first […]
  • by Ken McNab When the swirling crosscurrents of music and politics collide, a powerful social maelstrom is often left in its wake. In 1969, American rock ‘n’ roll staggered towards the end of an era which the literary critic … Read the article The post John Lennon: Historic Man of the People and the Pied […]
  • by Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Lieberman As the 1800 presidential election neared, Americans braced themselves. The Federalists, who dominated the presidency and both chambers of Congress, had become convinced that the Republicans, who functioned as the emerging opposition party, … Read the article The post The Soil Will Be Soaked with Blood appeared first […]
  • by Susan Eisenhower Few people have made decisions as momentous as Eisenhower, nor has one person had to make such a varied range of them. From D-Day to the Red Scare to the Missile Gap controversies, Ike was able to … Read the article The post How Ike Led: Accountability Without Caveats appeared first on […]
  • by Elsa Hart In 1714, the gardener and caretaker Edmund Howard supervised his employer’s move to a new home. It was an exhausting endeavor, and anyone who has stared into an overfull cardboard box at four in the morning on … Read the article The post Collecting the Treasures of the World appeared first on […]
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Reliving History Magazine: Summer 2018 Issue

Reliving History Magazine

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