Trump Turnberry Is Out of The Open

“We will not return until we are convinced that the focus will be on the championship, the players and the course itself and we do not believe that is achievable in the current circumstances.”

Martin Slumbers, CHIEF EXECUTIVE of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club
TURNBERRY, SCOTLAND – JULY 14: A general view of Trump Hotel on June 14, 2020 in Turnberry, Scotland. The Trump Turnberry is planning an expansion of its resort, targeting retirees and wealthy golf enthusiasts with a planned coastal retreat which would see hundreds of private houses, luxury apartments, and retirement villas built at its world-famous Turnberry resort. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Six bizarre things Trump said in his rambling golf statement including calling himself a ‘wonderful person’

By Greg Evans

July 18, 2021

Donald Trump is clearly missing the privilege of being able to rant and rave on Twitter as he used to as evidence by his latest press statement which is predominantly about his favourite subject (aside from himself) golf.

In a truly bizarre press release, the former president explained that he had spent a lot of time watching the Open Championship golf tournament which is currently happening in Scotland but not at the location where he would like to see it.

Trump writes:

“I have spent some time watching The Open Championship (formerly known as The British Open), and it is terrific! But as almost all of the great players, sportscasters, and golf aficionados know, the greatest site and course of all for The Open is Turnberry, in Scotland.”

If you hadn’t have guessed it already Turnberry is a luxury golf resort on the Firth of Clyde in Ayrshire which is now known as Trump Turnberry after the Trump Organisation purchased it in 2014. It hasn’t hosted the Open since 2009.

He continues:

“It is truly a magical place, the players want to be there, and at some point in time the players will be there.”

Steady on Donald. It’s not Disney World.

Next is possibly the strangest thing Trump has ever said and we don’t say that sort of thing lightly.

“But this course was not chosen for The Open because they consider a wonderful person, and many-time Club Champion, named Donald J. Trump, to be too controversial this is, of course, a false reputation caused mainly by the Media.”

Referring to himself in the first person now? Boy…get this man back on Twitter pronto. He is starving for the recognition of his supporters.

“Remember, though, the controversy only makes things “hotter.” In any event, Turnberry is also the course where the greatest match of all time was played, nicknamed ‘The Dual in the Sun,’ which boiled down to an Open between the great Jack Nicklaus and the great Tom Watson.”

Tom Watson of the US walks to the 10th tee during the final round of the British Open Golf championship, at the Turnberry golf course, Scotland, Sunday, July 19, 2009. (AP Photo/Jon Super)

This is a reference to the 1977 Open Championship which came down to Nicklaus and Watson which many consider to be one of the finest contests in golfing history. However, it is the ‘’ not ‘Dual in the Sun.’ Honestly…Also this took place decades before Trump owned the course so is he trying to take credit for it?

“Turnberry is on the ocean with the most spectacular holes, sightlines, shots, and seaside views of any course in the World.”

‘Spectacular holes’…movingly swiftly on.

“It is a shame that the phenomenal Turnberry Golf links, the best in the World, sits empty during Open Championships, while far lesser courses are on display. Oh well, life proceeds forward! Someday The Open will be back at Turnberry.”

Trump might consider it a shame that his course is being neglected but the Open has only been held there four times in the tournament’s entire history and never since he has owned it so we can’t see it returning there any time soon.

As you can imagine, Trump ramblings have been widely ridiculed on social media.

We just hope that Trump is playing a lot of golf at the moment because lord knows he didn’t get a chance to do that much when he was president.

TURNBERRY, SCOTLAND – JULY 15: A view of the green on the par 3, ninth hole on the Ailsa Course at the Trump Turnberry Resort on July 15, 2019 in Turnberry, Scotland. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)

Trump Describes Himself as ‘Wonderful Person’ While Complaining About Open Championship Site

BY CHRISTINA ZHAO 
7/17/21

Former President Donald Trump referred to himself as a “wonderful person” on Saturday, as he denounced The Open Championship for refusing to return to his golf course in Scotland.

Six days after the Capitol riot, the R&A, organizers of the world’s oldest golf tournament, announced that it had no plans in “the foreseeable future” to return to Trump Turnberry, purchased by the former president in 2014.

TURNBERRY, SCOTLAND – JULY 14: A general view of Trump Hotel on June 14, 2020 in Turnberry, Scotland. The Trump Turnberry is planning an expansion of its resort, targeting retirees and wealthy golf enthusiasts with a planned coastal retreat which would see hundreds of private houses, luxury apartments, and retirement villas built at its world-famous Turnberry resort. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Trump criticized the decision in a statement released Saturday, three days after the 2021 Open Championship began at Royal St. George’s Golf Club. “As almost all of the great players, sportscasters, and golf aficionados know, the greatest site and course of all for The Open is Turnberry, in Scotland,” he said.

“It is truly a magical place, the players want to be there, and at some point in time the players will be there,” Trump continued. “But this course was not chosen for The Open because they consider a wonderful person, and many-time Club Champion, named Donald J. Trump, to be too controversial—this is, of course, a false reputation caused mainly by the Fake News Media.”

The golf tournament was last held at Turnberry in 2009, though the Scotland golf course hosted the Women’s British Open in 2015, before The Ladies Golf Union merged with the R&A.

“It is a shame that the phenomenal Turnberry Golf links, the best in the World, sits empty during Open Championships, while far lesser courses are on display. Oh well, life proceeds forward! Someday The Open will be back at Turnberry,” Trump said.

A number of prominent businesses and institutions severed ties with Trump and his allies after the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, including the PGA of America, the New York State Bar Association, social media platforms and four of the country’s largest banks.


TURNBERRY, UNITED KINGDOM – JULY 09: Tom Watson of the USA marches ahead of Jack Nicklaus of the USA off the 14th tee during the final round of the 1977 Open Championship on the Ailsa Course at Turnberry on July 9, 1977 in Turnberry, Scotland. (Photo by Peter Dazeley/Getty Images)

The Duel In The Sun – The Open Championship 1977

One of the most memorable sporting contests of modern times, the 1977 Open Championship saw Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus, by many considered two of the best players in the history of golf, battle for the title in front of record-breaking crowds.

The tournament that truly set Turnberry on the road to greatness was the John Player Classic of 1972, attracting a field of the world’s leading players, including Arnold Palmer, Tom Weiskopf, Peter Thomson, Gary Player, Tony Jacklin and Peter Oosterhuis. But the winner, with a combined score of 285, was New Zealand’s Bob Charles. Despite some rather poor weather conditions, the John Player Classic proved that Turnberry could host to a major tournament, attract big names and cope admirably with a large crowd. Tournaments come no bigger, of course, than The Open Championship.

Even so, when the R&A announced that Turnberry would host its first Open in 1977, the choice was seen as something of a risk, with concerns over accommodation (the grand Turnberry hotel aside) and access. As history shows us, however, the reticence was to prove misplaced as Turnberry played host to record crowds and the most thrilling finish in Open history. Esteemed golfing writer, Donald Steel takes up the story: ‘The weather was on its best behaviour and the two finest players in the world at the time, Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus fought out the most brilliant and dramatic head-tohead confrontation imaginable…’

It was Turnberry’s greatest hour with the excitement exceeding any script that could have been written. There was an almost fictional touch about the climax as Watson came to the final hole one stroke ahead of Nicklaus. He hit the ideal iron to the corner of the dog-leg whereas Nicklaus’ tee shot drifted towards the gorse. On first inspection, it didn’t seem possible that Nicklaus could manufacture any kind of shot. When Watson, playing his second, hit a seven iron which sat down two feet from the hole, it seemed to be that. ‘However, Nicklaus, somehow, managed to catch an eight iron squarely enough to get his ball to the edge of the green – whereupon he holed it for a three. Watson’s putt which minutes before had looked no more than a formality suddenly took on a new dimension but it really was short and, in order to maintain the pattern of perfection, it was right that Watson knocked it firmly . ‘What happened in that Open took a long time to sink in and the superlatives about it have continued to flow.

The filmed version has been shown more times than Gone With the Wind. As an exhibition of superb strokeplay, courage and character, it may never be equalled. As an example of all that is good in the game it was a lesson to other sports.’

Although the golfing merits of Turnberry had been known to a national audience for many years, the Open of 1977 took the links onto the stage. Hours of television coverage and acres of newsprint put Turnberry firmly on the itinerary of any golfer worth his or her salt. After all, who wouldn’t want to play the course that had so enthralled the world and brought the very best out of two legends in the game.

“This is what it’s all about, isn’t it?”

-Watson to Nicklaus at the 16th tee of the final round

The Playoff – The Open Championship 2009

Tom Watson of the US walks to the 10th tee during the final round of the British Open Golf championship, at the Turnberry golf course, Scotland, Sunday, July 19, 2009. (AP Photo/Jon Super)

Almost as thrilled to see his nameplate screwed onto the door of one of the four luxury suites at the Turnberry Resort as he was to have his name engraved on the Claret Jug, Stewart Cink remembers his victory over Tom Watson in the 2009 staging of The Open Championship over The Ailsa links as the ultimate destination on a lifelong to glory.

A modest, towering American – this gentle giant from Georgia tips 6ft 4ins – with a competitive streak honed by five appearances in the Ryder Cup, Cink threw a combination of punches at Watson during the final round of the game’s most revered championship which eventually forced the old heavyweight of the British linksland onto the ropes. Out in 35 blows, the 36-year-old made four birdies on the inward half, including a 16 foot putt for 3 on the last, to sign off with an impressive score of 69.

After Watson missed an eight foot putt for par on the 72nd hole needed to collect his sixth Open title – both players had posted totals of 278 strokes – Cink dominated the four hole play-off. By that stage of what had been an astonishing tournament it seemed as if the air had finally expired from the veteran’s lungs as he shot bogey, par, double bogey and bogey. Cink, with youth on his side and a calm intake of breath, made par, par, birdie and birdie to win the showdown by six strokes.

Cink knew he had spoiled the ending most onlookers but had no need to feel any pity for Watson after pre-empting what would have one of the great sporting fairytales that day in Ayrshire. After all, the Kansas golfer’s name is inscribed on the Claret Jug five times while Cink’s moniker appears on the trophy only once. He was able to shrug off any mixed feelings about defeating the then 59-year-old in a play-off by harnessing any sense of conflict to clear his mind and collect his first major title. “It just doesn’t get any more satisfying than this,” Cink reflected. “After all the changes I’ve made, with the Claret Jug in my hands, I guess this transformation is now complete. The journey is not over, but I’m a believer now.”

“I started setting standards for myself that weren’t really achievable. So I got a little down on myself and I had to work through it. I’ve always had a good foundation away from the course to weather the storms as they come and go. I had some really good years from about 2004 until 2008 and then came the Open championship win in 2009. That was a really big arrival point for me, where all the time and sacrifices that I had made, became worth it.”

Having joined the professional ranks in 1997, Cink was the first golfer to follow up success as the Nationwide Tour’s player of the year with the PGA Tour’s rookie of the year award 12 months later. “At first I had plenty of confidence when I came onto the Tour,” he recalled. “I was young and I was eager. But over the years you play golf against the best players in the world and there is a lot more failure than there is success. So a little bit of doubt started to in.

As for Watson, four of his five Open titles were secured on Scottish turf at Carnoustie, Turnberry, Muirfield and Royal Troon – he also won in England at Royal Birkdale – and an enduring relationship with the game’s spiritual home began with an Open baptism in 1975 when he followed in the footsteps of Ben Hogan by winning at Carnoustie on his debut after a play-off against Jack Newton. While the victories which followed in 1980, 1982 and 1983 would earn pride of place in any other Open story, nothing captures the essence of Watson’s relationship with the oldest major quite like the Duel In The Sun, his astonishing win over Jack Nicklaus on the Ailsa during the summer of 1977.

Perhaps the 2009 staging of the championship would have been another Open for the ages if only Watson had made par at the last and emerged as not only the oldest winner in major history but also the most romantic champion in any sport. Yet, as is so often the case on the linksland, fate was dictated by the fickle bounce of the ancient turf.

TURNBERRY, SCOTLAND – JULY 19: Stewart Cink (L) of USA looks at the Claret Jug with Tom Watson of USA after his victory in a play off following the final round of the 138th Open Championship on the Ailsa Course, Turnberry Golf Club on July 19, 2009 in Turnberry, Scotland. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)

While there hadn’t been a hint of tightness on the 18th tee as Watson located another fairway, the veteran chose to strike an 8 iron rather than a 9 for the approach and the shot ran through the back of the green. “That 8 iron will always live with me, ” he rued. Watson duly chose to putt from the fringe and knocked the ball eight feet past the cup before coming up shy with the second. The outcome was sealed by that cruel bogey.

Cink, meanwhile, could look back on a roller-coaster of a closing inward half of 34 which included only two pars. The highlights on the back nine were a brace of 2s at the par 3s thanks to a 25-foot putt at the 11th and a six-footer following an 8 iron to the 15th green. Unlike Watson, Cink chose a 9 iron rather than an 8 for his approach to the last and reaped the reward. “I just felt so calm in a situation where previously I would be extremely nervous,” he said. “I was totally at peace with whatever happened.”

All this time later, perhaps now it’s a little easier to think of the 138th staging of The Open as Cink’s championship rather than Watson’s. After all, like the suite at the Turnberry Resort, it’s got his name on it.


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CPE

I'm routinely overestimated.

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